Grade 8 Unit 3 Establishment of US Government

West Haven Public Schools

Unit Planning Organizer

Subject - U.S. History                                                       

Grade - 8th

Unit – Establishment of U.S. Government                 

Pacing – Dec./Jan.

Essential Question(s):

1.     What is the Constitution and why do we need it?

2.     What are the 3 branches of government and what is their role in our government?

3.     What precedents were set by the Federalists?

4.     What compromises had to be made in order to create the Constitution?

5.     What are the rights and responsibilities citizens must abide by?

Big Idea(s):

1.     The U.S. Constitution is a document that sets the framework for our government.

2.     There are 3 branches of government, each responsible for different things.

3.     Early Federalist leaders set precedents for others to follow.

4.     Compromises had to be made in order to write the Constitution.

5.     According to the Constitution, citizens have certain rights and responsibilities.

CT State Standards (includes West Haven’s “Priority” GLES’s in BOLD and “Supporting” Standards)

 1.1.6    Analyze the significance of precedents established during the    

            Federalist Era.

1.1.9    Evaluate the impact of the compromises made at the

           Constitutional Convention.

1.7.1    Use contemporary examples to analyze the functions of the three

           branches (including checks and balances) of the U.S. government.

1.9.1          Explain the rights and responsibilities of U.S. citizens under the

           Constitution.

     1.8.1   Analyze the effect of the U.S. Constitution on the lives of U.S. citizens.

     1.9.2   Analyze the impact of court cases that expanded or limited rights and 

                responsibilities enumerated in the Constitution and Bill of Rights.

     1.9.3   Analyze points where rights and responsibilities of citizens are in

               conflict. 

     1.2.1  Analyze connections between local, state and national historical events.

 

2.2.1   Compare information about the same event by using a variety of

           primary sources.

2.2.2   Interpret primary and secondary sources to determine accuracy and

           validity.

2.3.1   Compose an essay stating a personal opinion on a historical event or

          social studies issue and support it with relevant evidence.

2.3.2   Organize and cite evidence from primary and secondary sources to

          support conclusions in an essay.

 

2.4.1   Orally present information on a social studies event or issue and

          support it with primary and secondary evidence.

2.4.2   Participate in formal debates on issues related to social studies.

2.5     Prepare an interpretive repot on a historical question and use

          appropriate visual evidence.

 

“Unwrapped” Concepts and Skills, and Bloom Levels (BL)

Concepts(Need to Know)

Skills(Able to Do)

BL

 

Precedents

Federalist Era

 

 

Compromises

Constitutional convention

 

 

Contemporary examples

3 branches of U.S. government

 

Rights and responsibilities

U.S. citizens

Constitution

 

Analyze (the significance)

 

 

 

Evaluation (the impact)

 

 

 

Use (examples)

Analyze (function)

 

Explain

 

4

 

 

 

5

 

 

 

4

4

 

2

 

Assessments

Common Formative Pre- Assessment (Followed by Data Team Analysis):

See Pre-Assessment Establishment of U.S. Government

  

“Dipsticks” (Informal Progress Monitoring Checks):

Will be created individually at the discretion of the classroom teacher.

Common Formative Post- Assessment (Followed by Data Team Analysis):

See Post-Assessment Establishment of U.S. Government

Instructional Planning

Suggested Resources/Materials:

“The American Nation”  Chapters 7 and 8

The Constitution of the United States

Suggested Research-based Effective Instructional Strategies:

Note taking

Graphic Organizers

Historical non-fiction reading

 

Vocabulary/Word Wall

Preamble

Precedent

Constitution

Bill of rights

Legislative Branch

Judicial Branch

Executive Branch

Checks and Balances

Bill

Veto

Amend

Amendment

Separation of powers

Override

Articles of Confederation

Republic

Compromise

Federalism

Citizen

Civic virtue

Naturalization

Unconstitutional

Northwest Ordinance

Democracy

Federalist

James Madison

Roger Sherman

George Washington

Daniel Shay

Patrick Henry

Alexander Hamilton

James Wilson

William Patterson

Philadelphia

New Jersey Plan

Virginia Plan

Great Compromise

Enrichment/Extension

 

Create a tree with the 3 branches of government.

Create a student Bill of Rights.

Citizenship Test

Community Service/Good Citizenship Project  ie. Food or clothing drive

Illustrate the Bill of Rights

Video

“Schoolhouse Rocks”

Interdisciplinary Connections

 

Art – Create a tree with the 3 branches of government

 

Art- Illustrate the Bill of Rights