Grade 5 Unit 4 The Constitution

West Haven Public Schools

Unit Planning Organizer

Subject:        Social Studies

Grade:           5

Unit:              The Constitution

Pacing:          4th Marking Period

Essential Question(s):

1.      How do people overcome differences and make decisions that benefit everyone?

2.      Why is a central government important?

3.      Why is it important to make sure no one person/group has too much power?

4.      How is the Constitution a ‘living document’?

Big Idea(s):

1.      Through discussion and understanding, people often overcome personal differences and make decisions that work for the common good of the nation and benefit everyone.

2.      A central government unites the nation, provides a fairer form of government, and secures peace, freedom, protection, justice, and liberty.

3.      Dividing government into three branches keeps any one branch from having too much power

4.      The Constitution, its amendments, and Bill or Rights continue to protect the rights freedoms of people in the United States.

CT State Standards (includes West Haven’s “Priority” GLES’s in BOLD and “Supporting” Standards)   

1.1.3 – Analyze how some conflicts have been resolved through compromise (e.g. U.S. Constitution)

1.1.5 – Evaluate the results achieved at the Constitutional Convention

1.7.1 – Describe the purpose, structure and functions of our national government

1.7.2 – Analyze how power in the United States is shared among local, state, and national governments

1.8.1 – Explain the process through which citizens can influence the making of laws in the United States

Supporting:

1.1.1       - Explain how specific individuals and their ideas and beliefs influenced American history.

1.2.1 –  Explain the connections between local, state, and national events (e.g. U.S. Constitution)

1.9.1 –  Analyze one’s rights and responsibilities as a citizen (e.g. voting, paying taxes, obeying laws)

1.11.1 – Explain how the government needs taxes to provide goods and services.

“Unwrapped” Concepts and Skills, and Bloom Levels (BL)

Concepts(Need to Know)

Skills(Able to Do)

BL

 

“Resolving conflicts through compromise

·         U.S. Constitution

·         Senate/House or Representatives

 

Results achieved at Constitutional Convention:

·         Federal system of government

·         The Great Compromise

·         Three-fifths compromise

 

The Constitution provides a structure of government

·         3 Branches of Government

·         Checks and Balances

·         Bill of Rights

 

Citizens can influence the making of laws in the United States.

 

 

 

Rights and Responsibilities of a citizen

·         Voting

·         Paying Taxes

·         Obeying laws

 

Government needs taxes to provide goods and services

 

Specific individuals and their ideas influenced American history

 

Connection between local, state, and national events

·         U.S. Constitution

 

Analyze – how conflicts get resolved

 

 

 

Evaluate results of Constitutional Convention

 

 

 

 

Analyze – how the Constitution provides a structure of government

 

 

 

 

Explain-the process of making laws in the United States

 

 

 

Analyze one’s rights and responsibilities as a citizen

 

 

 

Explain– how government needs taxes

 

 

Explain  how specific individuals influenced American history

 

Explain- the connection between local, state, and national events

 

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Assessments

Common Formative Pre- Assessment (Followed by Data Team Analysis):

 

“Dipsticks” (Informal Progress Monitoring Checks):

Common Formative Post- Assessment (Followed by Data Team Analysis):

Instructional Planning

Suggested Resources/Materials:

·        Textbook:  Harcourt Horizons:  Unit 5

o       Chapter 10, Lessons 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

·        Harcourt Activity Book

·        Flow Chart Activity- Lesson 3 - page 364 – 365

·        Videos

·        Computer Websites: See attachment - Interactive American History Websites


Suggested Research-based Effective Instructional Strategies:

1.      Develop vocabulary

2.      KWL chart

3.      Partner reads and discussions

4.      Response log entries – Summarizing

5.      Note taking

6.      Compare & contrast explorers – reasons for exploring

7.      Leveled Readers


 

Vocabulary/Word Wall

Enrichment/Extension

Interdisciplinary Connections

 

republic

inflation

ordinance

convention

commerce

federal system

bill

census

electoral college

veto

impeach

justice

checks and balances

ratify

Federalist

Anti-Federalist

amendment

Magna Carta

due process of law

reserved powers

cabinet

political party

candidate

 

Writing:  Imagine you are a delegate from your state; write a letter describing your experience at the Constitutional Convention.

Write a persuasive paper on whether you think the congress should be equally represented (as with the Senate) or if representation should be by population (House or Rep) and include reasons why one would be better than the other.

Make a timeline of events as to when certain events happened from the Second Continental Congress to the ratification of the Constitution

Collaboration Project:  Have students make a classroom “Bill of Rights”.  They can present them orally to the class and students can ‘vote’ on these proposals.

 

 SKILL STRANDS – Competence in literacy, inquiry and research skills is necessary to analyze, evaluate, and present history and social studies information

G.L.E.

Description

Unit 1

Unit 2

Unit 3

Unit 4

B.L.

2.1.1

Independently locate primary and secondary sources

 

 

 

 

 

2

2.1.2

Identify map symbols and map types (e.g. physical, political, economic products)

 

 

 

 

1

2.2.1

Use relevant social studies information to describe an author’s point of view (editorials)

 

 

 

 

2

2.2.2

Compare and contrast information provided by both primary and secondary sources

 

 

 

 

4

2.2.3

Use map symbols to interpret information from various map types

 

 

 

 

5

2.3.1

Create and expository piece using evidence to describe a historical event or issue (e.g. newspaper, form poetry, play)

 

 

 

 

2,6

2.4.1

Debate conflicting points of view on a historical issue or event by using evidence

 

 

 

 

4

2.4.2

Give an oral presentation on a social studies event or issue and use evidence from more than one source

 

 

 

 

2

2.5.1

Create maps of the United States (e.g. physical features, immigration, settlement, historical events).

 

 

 

 

6

2.5.2

Create a timeline of significant events of a historical period

 

 

 

 

6

APPLICATION STRANDS – Civic competence in addressing historical issues and current problems requires the use of information, skills, and empathetic awareness.

3.1.1

Identify and explain different points of view about a historical event (cause and effect)

 

 

 

 

2,3

3.1.2

Make and support judgments about the quality of information in text material

 

 

 

 

5

3.2.1

Analyze why people might have different points of view on a national contemporary issue

 

 

 

 

4

3.2.2

Use personal experience and/or outside readings to describe views and feelings of people in the past (e.g. Indian removal, segregation, Japanese relocation)

 

 

 

 

2

3.3.1

Predict how a current issue or event might affect one’s life

 

 

 

 

5

3.3.2

Assess the value of proposed solutions to contemporary issues

 

 

 

 

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